Boletus pallidoroseus (“Bouillon Bolete”)

Think “muddled bicolor.” Flesh often smells like beef bouillon. Stem flesh may slowly stain green from the base up and/or stem skin in.

Compare
SKU: Boletus pallidoroseus Categories: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Description

Genus: Boletus

Species: pallidoroseus

Common Name: Bouillon Bolete

Tells: Think “muddled bicolor.” Flesh often smells like beef bouillon. Stem flesh may slowly stain green from the base up and/or stem skin in.

Other Information: Cap more pinkish-red (or a tan) than true red, and stem not the distinct red-and-yellow of a Bicolor. Yellow pores age toward brown & bruise blue. White to yellow cap flesh may blue slowly & faintly. May grow in united clusters or as individuals.

More Notes: Not uncommon in the Pittsburgh area, where in the 2015 Spring we observed a slow (5-10 minutes), progressive (from the base up), blue-green stain in the stem flesh, which faded 10-20 minutes later. Later in the year the green was more erratic. Reports from other regions confirm similar progressive staining, often near the stem skin more than the base.

Edibility: Edible, with little flavor but a fantastic texture. Your author plans some experiments with a bit of smoke to follow up on braising or roasting. It works like a charm with Chicken of the Woods…

CHEMICAL TESTS:

  • NH4OH (Ammonia): Cap surface turns greenish olive, then darkens. Cap flesh turns bright yellow, then pale gray.
  • KOH: Cap surface turns rusty brown. Cap flesh turns orange.
  • FeSO4 (Iron Salts): No data.

Links:

National Audubon Society Field guide to Mushrooms, Gary Lincoff 0 Mushrooms of West Virginia and the Central Appalachians 0 North American Boletes 135 129

Got something to discuss?