Leccinellum crocipodium

Yellow pores stain browner. Cap flesh stains red/pinkish-gray. Pitted cap ages from blackish to yellow-brown, & often cracks/fissures w/age.

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SKU: Leccinum crocipodium Categories: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Description

Name in North American Boletes: Leccinum nigrescens

Genus: Leccinellum

  • Genus 2: Leccinum

Species: crocipodium

  • Species: nigrescens

Common Name:

Tells: Yellow pores stain browner. Cap flesh stains red/pinkish-gray. Pitted cap ages from blackish to yellow-brown, & often cracks/fissures w/age.

Other Information: Likes oak. Stem is yellowish (sometimes red-brown by base), often swollen in the middle or lower region, & has scabers that darken from brown to blackish. Hard to distinguish from L. rugosiceps, except that cap is usually lighter, the stem doesn’t sell, the flesh stains a deeper red, & the pores DNS except for the occasional blue-green mark when you find it. Both are good edibles so it doesn’t matter much from a practical point of view.

Science Notes: DNA testing moved this mushroom from Leccinum to the newly erected genus Leccinellum. The powers that be then changed the species name too for good measure.

Edibility: Good.

CHEMICAL TESTS:

  • NH4OH (Ammonia): Cap skin turns reddish brown.
  • KOH: No data.
  • FeSO4 (Iron Salts): Cap skin has no reaction.

Links:

National Audubon Society Field guide to Mushrooms, Gary Lincoff 0 Mushrooms of West Virginia and the Central Appalachians 0 North American Boletes 209 240

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