Aureoboletus innixus (“Clustered Brown Bolete”)

Often grows in clusters. Yellow w/brown stem often viscid by base. Bright yellow mycelium. Pale cap flesh w/ reddish brown by the skin. Powerful odor.

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Description

Name in North American Boletes: Boletus innixus

Genus: Aureoboletus

  • Genus 2: Boletus
  • Genus 3: Pulveroboletus

Species: innixus

  • Species 2: auriporus
  • Species 3: caespitosus

Common Name: “Clustered Brown Bolete”

Tells: Often grows in clusters. Yellow w/brown stem often viscid by base. Bright yellow mycelium. Pale cap flesh w/ reddish brown by the skin. Powerful odor.

Other Information: Likes oaks. Said to have a “musty odor reminiscent of witch hazel,” to me it has a “Too Much Mushroom!” odor that gives you a headache, with a mild overlay of something metallic. Pores start tiny but can expand w/age . Cap often cracks w/ age & can be viscid when wet. Even when the stem isn’t obviously bulbous, it will usually attenuate into a pointy root-like ending at the bottom. Known to be drought resistant.

Science Notes: DNA testing moved this mushroom into the newly erected genus “Aureoboletus.”

Edibility: Good but not special. A classic example of babky.

CHEMICAL TESTS:

  • NH4OH (Ammonia): Cap surface flashes green and then turns a dull orange-red. Cap flesh turns dull pinkish-orange.
  • KOH: Cap surface turns deep red-brown. Cap flesh turns dull pinkish-orange.
  • FeSO4 (Iron Salts): Cap surface turns pale olive. Cap flesh turns pale gray.

Links:

National Audubon Society Field guide to Mushrooms, Gary Lincoff  0 Mushrooms of West Virginia and the Central Appalachians 327 North American Boletes 123 62

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