Caloboletus rubripes (“Western Bitter Bolete”)

Pale cap flesh blues instantly, tastes bitter & often smells bad. Yellow pores blue instantly. Buff to olive- or gray-brown cap bruises brown & often cracks & fissures w/age.

SKU: Boletus rubripes Categories: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Description

Name in North American Boletes: Boletus rubripes

Genus: Caloboletus

  • Genus 2: Boletus

Species: rubripes

Common Name: “Western Bitter Bolete”

  • Common Name 2: “Red-Stemmed Bitter Bolete”

Tells: Pale cap flesh blues instantly, tastes bitter & often smells bad. Yellow pores blue instantly. Buff to olive- or gray-brown cap bruises brown & often cracks & fissures w/age.

Other Information: Stem is yellow on top, & bright pink- to purple-red moving down, but can also be a plain buff. Stem bruises blue, then slowly fades to gray-olive. Confirmed findings in Long Island on west coast wood mulch.

Science Notes: DNA testing moved this mushroom from Boletus to a newly erected genus called “Caloboletus”.

Edibility: Avoid. Too bitter to eat.

CHEMICAL TESTS:

  • NH4OH (Ammonia): No data.
  • KOH: Cap flesh turns yellow-orange.
  • FeSO4 (Iron Salts): No data.

Links:

National Audubon Society Field guide to Mushrooms, Gary Lincoff 0 Mushrooms of West Virginia and the Central Appalachians 0 North American Boletes 153

Got something to discuss?


Guest
John
1 year 2 months ago

Believe I just saw one in Ohio.

Guest
Toni
1 year 3 days ago

Believe I may have tried to cook and eat one on Kitsap peninsula in wa. Mistook it for a different bolete. It didn’t smell bad, but it didn’t make it past the first taste bud before I spit it out. Nasty 🤢