Phylloporus leucomycelinus (“Gilled Bolete”)

Has gills instead of pores, which DNS. White mycelium. Dark red to reddish- or chestnut brown cap cracks & fissures w/age.

SKU: Phylloporus leucomycelinus & rhodoxanthus Categories: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Description

Genus: Phylloporus

Species: leucomycelinus

  • Species 2: rhodoxanthus var. albomycelinus

Common Name: “Gilled Bolete”

Tells: Has gills instead of pores, which DNS. White mycelium. Dark red to reddish- or chestnut brown cap cracks & fissures w/age.

Other Information: In addition to the different colored mycelium, some sources suggest that Phy. rhodoxanthus has brighter yellow baby gills & duller old man gills than Phy. leucomycelinus. Beyond that they are very hard to tell apart.

Edibility: Good.

CHEMICAL TESTS:

  • NH4OH (Ammonia): Cap skin turns blue.
  • KOH: No data.
  • FeSO4 (Iron Salts): No data.

Links:

National Audubon Society Field guide to Mushrooms, Gary Lincoff 672 Mushrooms of West Virginia and the Central Appalachians 150 North American Boletes 221 BENA 284-

287

Got something to discuss?


Guest
Elizabeth
1 month 29 days ago

So… if it has gills, what would even make you consider it being a bolete? I’m a bare beginner, but I thought boletes always had pores.

Support
Scott Pavelle
1 month 28 days ago

The overall shape and heft are compelling. Nowadays we can add DNA evidence.