Boletus subluridellus

Reddish cap bruises blue/black & is often olive when young. Pores start rosy red, age to orange, & bruise blue. Pale yellow stem, often w/reddish dots, browns from base up w/age. Pungent odor.

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Description

Genus: Boletus

Species: subluridellus

Common Name:

Tells: Reddish cap bruises blue/black & is often olive when young. Pores start rosy red, age to orange, & bruise blue. Pale yellow stem, often w/reddish dots, browns from base up w/age. Pungent odor.

Other Information: Bright yellow flesh blues too, also very fast. Likes oak. Stem may be dotted but is not netted and does not have hairs, which distinguishes from lookalikes. Odor described as “peculiar and somewhat pungent but distinctive.”

Edibility: The traditional instruction in America was clear: “Avoid the red-pored blue-stainers like this one because they are known sick makers.” That came under question beginning in the 2010’s as DNA evidence proved that these mushrooms are quite distinct from the Rubroboletus and Suillellus genera that contain the true “Satans Boletes”. For what it’s worth, the lookalike European mushroom called luridimormis/discolor is a highly prized edible commonly known as the Scarletina. So it comes down to your taste for adventure and your respect for received wisdom.

CHEMICAL TESTS:

  • NH4OH (Ammonia): No data.
  • KOH: No data.
  • FeSO4 (Iron Salts): Blue-stained cap flesh turns yellow and then orange.

Links:

National Audubon Society Field guide to Mushrooms, Gary Lincoff 0 Mushrooms of West Virginia and the Central Appalachians 291 North American Boletes 164 163

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